DON’T FORGET YOUR DNA WHEN GROCERY SHOPPING

In the UK, a new wearable called DnaNudge may forever alter how shoppers choose their groceries. Users will take a standard DNA test, and the specific genetic code relating to nutrition-related health conditions will be analyzed. Results will be loaded onto a wearable capsule and linked to an accompanying app that lets users know which things such as sugar, fat or salt they need to avoid or eat—depending on what hereditary conditions they may have (obesity, heart disease, diabetes, etc.). While shopping for groceries, the wearable will scan products and flash either red or green to let users know if the product is OK for their diet. Through a sharable program (dubbed NudgeShare per the DnaNudge website), shoppers can select products that are a good fit for the whole family in a single trip.

Full article from The Telegraph

YOUR FOOD PRESCRIPTION IS NOW READY AT THE COUNTER

Kroger is testing the idea of “food prescriptions” that will see in-store nutritionists help shoppers fulfill dietary recommendations from their doctors. Working with the knowledge that a doctor’s nutritional advice is often vague, such as “eat better,” the retailer will use these in-store experts to help make specific recommendations that can be tailored to a shopper’s lifestyle, cooking skills and budget. It’s a nice context move—right time, right place and right person—to have a nutritionist present where shoppers are buying food.

Full article from The Spoon

STEP INTO AN EXOSKELETON FOR YOUR WORKOUT

Samsung is reimagining home workouts with the conceptual development of AR glasses and an exoskeleton accessory that work together. The exoskeleton is a futuristic-looking belt that tracks the user’s movements, and when paired with the glasses, allows a virtual trainer to help improve the form and posture for any given exercise. While the virtual trainer will offer feedback during the workout, an accompanying app will provide more detailed recommendations once the workout is complete. Improving form and posture should lead to fewer workout-related injuries.

Full article from Engadget